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Biocor™ Stented Tissue Valve - St. Jude Medical

Biocor™ Stented Tissue Valve

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Tissue Heart Valves | St. Jude Medical

After 200 implants, the Trifecta valve allowed a relatively simple implant, and the technique is not much different from that of other supported biological valves. In our opinion, there are two key points. The first is a high and wide aortotomy. The prosthesis has a high profile, so it is advisable to make a high aortotomy, ~1–2 cm above the sinotubular junction. To compensate for the difficulties arising from the high-aortotomy approach, a wide aortotomy is recommended. The second key point and the most important, is to properly size the valve. The intra-annular sizer must fit in the aortic annulus, but it should not be very tight. Oversizing increases the difficulty of implantation, particularly when placing the prosthesis in the valvular plane and when knotting. Oversizing could also produce gradient increases due to an excess of prosthetic leaflet tissue, which could be the reason why our EOAs were slightly higher than the St. Jude Medical data. Care must also be taken not to distort the valve stent when lowering the valve into the aortic annulus.

A 20-year experience of 1712 patients with the Biocor porcine bioprosthesis

N2 - Background: Pericardial bioprostheses have favorable echocardiographic hemodynamics in the aortic position compared with porcine valves; however, there are few data comparing clinical outcomes. Our objective was to assess the late results of the two valve types. Methods: We reviewed 2,979 patients aged 65 years or older undergoing aortic valve replacement with pericardial (n = 1,976) or porcine (n = 1,003) prostheses between January 1993 and December 2007. The most common pericardial prostheses were Carpentier-Edwards Perimount and Mitroflow, and the most common porcine valves were Medtronic Mosaic, Carpentier-Edwards, Hancock modified orifice, and St. Jude Biocor. Follow-up extended to a maximum of 16 years (mean, 5.2 ± 3.5 years). Results: Survival at 5, 10 and 12 years was, respectively, 68%, 33%, and 21% overall, was 68%, 30%, and 16% for patients with pericardial bioprosthesis, and was 69%, 38% and 27% for the porcine group. In a multivariate model, long-term survival was reduced in patients with diabetes, renal failure, prior myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and older age, but late survival was not higher in the pericardial valve group. Overall freedom from reoperation was 96%, 92%, and 90% at 5, 10, and 12 years, and freedom from explant was 98%, 96%, and 94% during the same period. The reason for explant was structural valve deterioration in 50 patients (2%). Conclusions: Despite the better hemodynamic performance documented in prior investigations, pericardial valves do not confer any survival advantage over porcine valves in patients aged 65 years or older undergoing aortic valve replacement.

St Jude Medical Epic porcine bioprosthesis: Results of …

A 20-year experience with 1,712 patients with the Biocor porcine bioprosthesis.

Background: Pericardial bioprostheses have favorable echocardiographic hemodynamics in the aortic position compared with porcine valves; however, there are few data comparing clinical outcomes. Our objective was to assess the late results of the two valve types. Methods: We reviewed 2,979 patients aged 65 years or older undergoing aortic valve replacement with pericardial (n = 1,976) or porcine (n = 1,003) prostheses between January 1993 and December 2007. The most common pericardial prostheses were Carpentier-Edwards Perimount and Mitroflow, and the most common porcine valves were Medtronic Mosaic, Carpentier-Edwards, Hancock modified orifice, and St. Jude Biocor. Follow-up extended to a maximum of 16 years (mean, 5.2 ± 3.5 years). Results: Survival at 5, 10 and 12 years was, respectively, 68%, 33%, and 21% overall, was 68%, 30%, and 16% for patients with pericardial bioprosthesis, and was 69%, 38% and 27% for the porcine group. In a multivariate model, long-term survival was reduced in patients with diabetes, renal failure, prior myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and older age, but late survival was not higher in the pericardial valve group. Overall freedom from reoperation was 96%, 92%, and 90% at 5, 10, and 12 years, and freedom from explant was 98%, 96%, and 94% during the same period. The reason for explant was structural valve deterioration in 50 patients (2%). Conclusions: Despite the better hemodynamic performance documented in prior investigations, pericardial valves do not confer any survival advantage over porcine valves in patients aged 65 years or older undergoing aortic valve replacement.

AB - Background: Pericardial bioprostheses have favorable echocardiographic hemodynamics in the aortic position compared with porcine valves; however, there are few data comparing clinical outcomes. Our objective was to assess the late results of the two valve types. Methods: We reviewed 2,979 patients aged 65 years or older undergoing aortic valve replacement with pericardial (n = 1,976) or porcine (n = 1,003) prostheses between January 1993 and December 2007. The most common pericardial prostheses were Carpentier-Edwards Perimount and Mitroflow, and the most common porcine valves were Medtronic Mosaic, Carpentier-Edwards, Hancock modified orifice, and St. Jude Biocor. Follow-up extended to a maximum of 16 years (mean, 5.2 ± 3.5 years). Results: Survival at 5, 10 and 12 years was, respectively, 68%, 33%, and 21% overall, was 68%, 30%, and 16% for patients with pericardial bioprosthesis, and was 69%, 38% and 27% for the porcine group. In a multivariate model, long-term survival was reduced in patients with diabetes, renal failure, prior myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and older age, but late survival was not higher in the pericardial valve group. Overall freedom from reoperation was 96%, 92%, and 90% at 5, 10, and 12 years, and freedom from explant was 98%, 96%, and 94% during the same period. The reason for explant was structural valve deterioration in 50 patients (2%). Conclusions: Despite the better hemodynamic performance documented in prior investigations, pericardial valves do not confer any survival advantage over porcine valves in patients aged 65 years or older undergoing aortic valve replacement.

St Jude Medical Epic porcine bioprosthesis : ..

St Jude Medical Epic porcine bioprosthesis: Results of the regulatory ..

The Trifecta valve offers a good alternative to other biological stented aortic valves. This study establishes excellent early clinical and haemodynamic performance at discharge, but further evaluation is needed during the follow-up.

The St. Jude Medical Trifecta aortic valve is easy to implant, but special care must be taken to avoid oversizing, which can lead to difficulty in implantation and produce gradient increases due to an excess of prosthetic leaflet tissue.

St Jude Medical Epic porcine bioprosthesis is ..
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    Tissue heart valves from St

  • The Carpentier-Edwards porcine valve bioprosthesis, ..

    The St Jude Medical Biocor porcine bioprosthesis is the precursor valve to the St Jude Medical Epic valve.

  • bioprosthesis valve now marketed by St

    Discover all the information about the product Aortic valve bioprosthesis / porcine tissue Epic™ - St

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St Jude Medical-Biocor bovine pericardial bioprosthesis: ..

The Trifecta aortic bioprosthesis is a stented bovine pericardial tissue heart valve created exclusively for the aortic position. It is designed for supra-annular placement.

and the St Jude Medical-Biocor ..

Our primary study endpoint was to evaluate the clinical and haemodynamic performance of the Trifecta bioprosthesis in the early postoperative period.

Five-year evaluation of the Carpentier-Edwards porcine bioprosthesis.

Supra-annular placement of an aortic bioprosthesis is one approach to optimize the haemodynamic result of an aortic valve replacement. With this concept, the internal valve diameter should theoretically be equal to the tissue annulus diameter and thus achieve an optimal haemodynamic performance with no obstruction of the blood flow.

Jude Medical Biocor bioprosthesis: ..

The indexed valve effective orifice areas (iEOA) were 1.01 ± 0.2 cm2/m2 (size 19 valve), 1.1 ± 0.3 cm2/m2 (size 21 valve), 1.19 cm2/m2 ± 0.3 (size 23 valve), 1.05 cm2/m2 ± 0.1 (size 25 valve) and 1.15 ± 0.03 cm2/m2 (size 27 valve). These EOAs were slightly higher than those from St. Jude Medical data (Fig. ).

Jude Medical Biocor bioprosthesis in the aortic ..

The primary study endpoint was the clinical and haemodynamic performances of the Trifecta bioprosthesis in the early postoperative period. It included major adverse prosthesis-related events according to the guidelines for reporting mortality and morbidity after cardiac valve intervention []. Moreover, we also reported transvalvular gradients, effective orifice area (EOA) and prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) determined by echocardiography.

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