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Antithesis - Examples and Definition of Antithesis

Personally, I would like to read fenn’s bio from the chest… I’d have it decorated in its very own Gold Leaf book cover, and printed in bronzed color ink, shadowed in dark ink, with the original copy placed in glass, being displayed next to the chest.

A sonnet is a fourteen-line poem in iambic pentameter with a carefully patterned rhyme scheme.

I stand by what I said. You can use either or both, but you get more info by combining them. The poem provides the precise points that I have needed to travel to, and I could have got to where I am now with the aid of just a paper map and a GPS (since my solution relies on coordinates from the poem). However, my confidence has been boosted hugely by using GE. It is also a real convenience to be able to plot trajectories on a digital resource, particularly during a BOTG trip.

Literary Terms - Antithesis - Shakespeare Online

Again I am very happy with my base assumptions: poem plus digital and paper maps, plus GPS = happy searcher! As for not using any map at all… good luck with that!

"In Table-talk, Guardian Newspaper of Jan. 25, 1871, under the head ''Stanzas published in great poems and afterwards rejected'' there are given besides the well-known lines ''There scattered oft,'' &c. which Gray indeed wrote but never published, the following which he certainly neither wrote nor published:

''Some rural Laïs, with all conquering charms,
Perhaps now moulders in this grassy bourne,
Some Helen, vain to set the fields in arms,
Some Emma dead, of gentle love forlorn.''
(I owe this quotation to the Rev. Lewis Hensley, Vicar of Hitchin.)
There is no trace whatever, as far as I can discover, connecting these lines with Gray. They seem to be the work of some early champion of the claims of Womanhood.
The stanza in Fraser MS. follows of present text."

Poems from different poets all around the world

"In Table-talk, Guardian Newspaper of Jan. 25, 1871, under the head ''Stanzas published in great poems and afterwards rejected'' there are given besides the well-known lines ''There scattered oft,'' &c. which Gray indeed wrote but never published, the following which he certainly neither wrote nor published:

''Some rural Laïs, with all conquering charms,
Perhaps now moulders in this grassy bourne,
Some Helen, vain to set the fields in arms,
Some Emma dead, of gentle love forlorn.''
(I owe this quotation to the Rev. Lewis Hensley, Vicar of Hitchin.)
There is no trace whatever, as far as I can discover, connecting these lines with Gray. They seem to be the work of some early champion of the claims of Womanhood.
The stanza in Fraser MS. follows of present text."

So coordinates….(boy this is going to open a can of worms). Isn’t the lure of the coordinate just what you said…precision of getting to a spot? If you told me the coordinates for the chest itself are in the poem then coordinates=precision would make sense…..however if that were true then why do we need the rest of the poem….short-cut time? Using coordinates to get you part way there doesn’t seem like it sweetens the concept of precision.

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  • Search for poems and poets using the Poetry Search Engine

    Poem toured all over Europe in the spring of 2016, as support for mighty Amorphis, with loads of new followers.

  • Repetition - Examples and Definition of Repetition

    One of the blazes is 4 miles from the parking spot. It took Forrest 15 years to construct the poem and puzzle.

  • INTROMENTAL WORLDWIDE - Uniting the Powers of …

    so JDA… Is it now your opinion that ff made the blaze he put in the poem for us to solve? Just curious

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Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 75

"In Table-talk, Guardian Newspaper of Jan. 25, 1871, under the head ''Stanzas published in great poems and afterwards rejected'' there are given besides the well-known lines ''There scattered oft,'' &c. which Gray indeed wrote but never published, the following which he certainly neither wrote nor published:

''Some rural Laïs, with all conquering charms,
Perhaps now moulders in this grassy bourne,
Some Helen, vain to set the fields in arms,
Some Emma dead, of gentle love forlorn.''
(I owe this quotation to the Rev. Lewis Hensley, Vicar of Hitchin.)
There is no trace whatever, as far as I can discover, connecting these lines with Gray. They seem to be the work of some early champion of the claims of Womanhood.
The stanza in Fraser MS. follows of present text."

Be a Man. Read a Poem. - The Art of Manliness

"For the allusions to Hampden (1594-1643), Milton (1608-1674), and Cromwell (1599-1658), the student should refer to a History.
Instead of these three names there are, in the Original MS., Cato, Tully, and Caesar; but the change to well-known characters of our own country has added to the vividness as well as fixed the nationality of a poem that has been translated into so many languages.
It is noteworthy that both Hampden and Milton lived in Buckinghamshire - the county in which is the Stoke-Poges Churchyard. Hampden was M.P. for Buckingham, and it was as a resident of that county that he refused to pay ship money. Chalfont, in which is the cottage where Milton finished ''Paradise Lost,'' is only a few miles from the ''Churchyard'' of the ''Elegy.''
Mitford quotes the following from Plautus as the thought in brief of this stanza and lines : - ''Ut saepe summa ingenia in occulto latent, / Hic qualis imperator, nunc privatus est.'' - Captiv. iv. 2."

The Myth of Christianity Founding Science and Medicine

"These lines on unfulfilled greatness among the villagers have been compared to Dryden, Annus Mirabilis 849-54: 'As when some dire Usurper Heav'n provides, / To scourge his Country with a lawless sway: / His birth, perhaps, some petty Village hides, / And sets his Cradle out of Fortune's way: // Till fully ripe his swelling fate breaks out, / And hurries him to mighty mischief on'; and Shenstone, The Schoolmistress (1745) st. xxvii-xxix, in which 'The firm fixed breast which fit and right requires, / Like Vernon's patriot soul', a potential Milton, and other great men are seen in embryo among the schoolchildren. Thomson's panegyric of England's 'sons of glory' in Summer 1488-91, 1493, includes: 'a steady More, / Who, with a generous though mistaken zeal, / Withstood a brutal tyrant's useful rage; / Like Cato firm ... / A dauntless soul erect, who smiled on death.' Thomson goes on to mention in this passage (not expanded to this form until 1744) Hampden, l. 1515: 'Wise, strenuous, firm, of unsubmitting soul'; and Milton, ll. 1567-71. As is shown below, G[ray].'s instances of greatness were originally classical in the Eton MS. The alteration to Hampden, Milton and Cromwell corresponds to the fact that the continuation of the poem after the original ending is markedly less classical and more English in character. But G. also wanted examples of greatness which had proved dangerous to society (as opposed to the innocence of the villagers) and the Civil War, 100 years earlier, provided him with three convenient examples. For all their individual qualities, these three men had been responsible in one way or another for bringing turmoil to their country. Without assenting to the identification of the churchyard with Stoke Poges, it is possible to accept Tovey's suggestion that G. may also have been influenced to some extent by the Buckinghamshire connections of Milton, who spent several early years at Horton, and Hampden, whose family home was at Great Hampden, where he was often visited by Cromwell."

Facts and information and how to define different Types of Poetry

"These lines on unfulfilled greatness among the villagers have been compared to Dryden, Annus Mirabilis 849-54: 'As when some dire Usurper Heav'n provides, / To scourge his Country with a lawless sway: / His birth, perhaps, some petty Village hides, / And sets his Cradle out of Fortune's way: // Till fully ripe his swelling fate breaks out, / And hurries him to mighty mischief on'; and Shenstone, The Schoolmistress (1745) st. xxvii-xxix, in which 'The firm fixed breast which fit and right requires, / Like Vernon's patriot soul', a potential Milton, and other great men are seen in embryo among the schoolchildren. Thomson's panegyric of England's 'sons of glory' in Summer 1488-91, 1493, includes: 'a steady More, / Who, with a generous though mistaken zeal, / Withstood a brutal tyrant's useful rage; / Like Cato firm ... / A dauntless soul erect, who smiled on death.' Thomson goes on to mention in this passage (not expanded to this form until 1744) Hampden, l. 1515: 'Wise, strenuous, firm, of unsubmitting soul'; and Milton, ll. 1567-71. As is shown below, G[ray].'s instances of greatness were originally classical in the Eton MS. The alteration to Hampden, Milton and Cromwell corresponds to the fact that the continuation of the poem after the original ending is markedly less classical and more English in character. But G. also wanted examples of greatness which had proved dangerous to society (as opposed to the innocence of the villagers) and the Civil War, 100 years earlier, provided him with three convenient examples. For all their individual qualities, these three men had been responsible in one way or another for bringing turmoil to their country. Without assenting to the identification of the churchyard with Stoke Poges, it is possible to accept Tovey's suggestion that G. may also have been influenced to some extent by the Buckinghamshire connections of Milton, who spent several early years at Horton, and Hampden, whose family home was at Great Hampden, where he was often visited by Cromwell."

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