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An advantage of biomass-to-liquid fuel synthesis is …

: Renewable liquid fuels, such as , are reacted with high-temperature steam to produce hydrogen near the point of end use.

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8.5 Fischer-Tropsch Process to Generate Liquid Fuels

Used for making acetone; used as a solvent for oils, gums, resins; used as a deicing agent for liquid fuels; used in pharmaceuticals, perfumes, lacquers, as a preservative, antifreeze and rocket fuel.

However, another methanol synthesis reaction allows for CO2 to be in the feed gas:

A synthesis gas can also be created by reacting coal or biomass with high-temperature steam and oxygen in a pressurized gasifier, which is converted into gaseous components—a process called gasification. The resulting synthesis gas contains hydrogen and carbon monoxide, which is reacted with steam to separate the hydrogen.

The intent is to maximize liquid transportation fuel ..

AB - Reforming of methane is practiced on a vast scale globally for the production of syngas as a precursor for the production of many commodities, including hydrogen, ammonia and synthetic liquid fuels. Solar reforming can reduce the greenhouse gas intensity of syngas production by up to about 40% by using solar thermal energy to provide the endothermic heat of reaction, traditionally supplied by combustion of some of the feed. This has the potential to enable the production of solar derived synthetic fuels as drop in replacements for conventional fuels with significantly lower CO2 intensity than conventional gas to liquids (GTL) processes. However, the intermittent nature of the solar resource - both diurnal and seasonal - poses significant challenges for such a concept, which relies on synthesis processes that typically run continuously on very stable feed compositions. We find that the integration of solar syngas production to a GTL process is a non-trivial exercise, with the ability to turn down the capacity of the GTL synthesis section, and indeed to suspend operations for short periods without significant detriment to product quality or process operability, likely to be a key driver for the commercial implementation of solar liquid fuels. Projected costs for liquid fuel synthesis suggest that solar reforming and small scale gas to liquid synthesis can potentially compete with conventional oil derived transport fuels in the short to medium term.

François-Xavier Felpin was born in Villefranche-sur-Saône, France, in 1977. He received his Ph.D degree in 2003 from the University of Nantes under the supervision of Professor Jacques Lebreton working on the synthesis of alkaloids. After receiving his Ph.D., he was engaged in a postdoctoral position with Professor Robert S. Coleman at The Ohio State University working on the synthesis of mitomycin. In 2004, he joined the University of Bordeaux as an assistant professor and received his habilitation in 2009. In the fall of 2011, he moved to the University of Nantes, where he was promoted to full professor. Prof. Felpin is a junior member of the Institut Universitaire de France, and he recently received the 2014 Young Researcher Award from the French Chemical Society. His research interests include heterogeneous and homogeneous sustainable catalysis, new technologies, and material chemistry.

Scientists Synthesize Liquid Fuel from Solar Energy

N2 - Reforming of methane is practiced on a vast scale globally for the production of syngas as a precursor for the production of many commodities, including hydrogen, ammonia and synthetic liquid fuels. Solar reforming can reduce the greenhouse gas intensity of syngas production by up to about 40% by using solar thermal energy to provide the endothermic heat of reaction, traditionally supplied by combustion of some of the feed. This has the potential to enable the production of solar derived synthetic fuels as drop in replacements for conventional fuels with significantly lower CO2 intensity than conventional gas to liquids (GTL) processes. However, the intermittent nature of the solar resource - both diurnal and seasonal - poses significant challenges for such a concept, which relies on synthesis processes that typically run continuously on very stable feed compositions. We find that the integration of solar syngas production to a GTL process is a non-trivial exercise, with the ability to turn down the capacity of the GTL synthesis section, and indeed to suspend operations for short periods without significant detriment to product quality or process operability, likely to be a key driver for the commercial implementation of solar liquid fuels. Projected costs for liquid fuel synthesis suggest that solar reforming and small scale gas to liquid synthesis can potentially compete with conventional oil derived transport fuels in the short to medium term.

Tewodros (Teddy) Asefa is currently a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ. He is also a member of the Rutgers Institute for Materials, Devices, and Nanotechnology (IAMDN) and the Rutgers Energy Institute (REI). In December 2009, he helped to put together the Rutgers Catalysis Research Center (RCRC). His group at Rutgers is involved in the development of synthetic methods of a wide array of functional and core/shell nanomaterials and the investigation of their potential applications in catalysis, electrocatalysis, targeted delivery of drugs to specific cells, nanocytotoxicity, solar cells, and environmental remediation. He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award (2007–2012), the NSF Special Creativity Award in 2011, the Rutgers Board of Governors Research Fellowship in 2012, and multiple federal and local research grants. He was named the National Science Foundation American Competitiveness Fellow (NSF ACIF) in 2010 and also serves as a panelist for several federal and international agencies. He has recently coedited a book on nanocatalysis (Wiley) and has written over 120 peer-reviewed scientific papers and several book chapters over the past decade.

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  • Find out information about Synthetic Liquid Fuel

    Loading Liquid fuel synthesis using nuclear power in a mobile energy depot system / M. Beller, M. Steinberg..

  • (173c) Synthesis of Liquid Fuel from Woody Biomass by …

    It is used in organic synthesis, as a refrigerant, as a fuel and as an aerosol propellant.

  • Small-Scale Gas To Liquid Fuel Synthesis PDF

    It is used primarily for a domestic fuel, an industrial fuel, motor fuel and in chemical synthesis.

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the liquid fuel synthesis component itself ..

Xiaoxi Huang was born in China. He received a B.S. degree in pharmaceutical science (2011) from the Peking University Health Science Center. He is now a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, under the supervision of Prof. Tewodros (Teddy) Asefa. His current research interests include the design and synthesis of novel multifunctional nanomaterials for biomedical and catalysis applications.

Nanocomposites: synthesis, structure, properties and …

: Synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and a small amount of carbon dioxide, is created by reacting natural gas with high-temperature steam. The carbon monoxide is reacted with water to produce additional hydrogen. This method is the cheapest, most efficient, and most common. Natural gas reforming using steam accounts for the majority of hydrogen produced in the United States annually.

Electrochemical routes for industrial synthesis - SciELO

Xiaoxin Zou was awarded a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Jilin University, China, in June 2011, and then moved to the University of California, Riverside, and then Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, as a postdoctoral scholar from July 2011 to October 2013. He is currently an associate professor in the State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry at Jilin University. His research interests focus on the design and synthesis of noble-metal-free, nanostructured, and/or nanoporous materials for water splitting and renewable energy applications.

Cleaner, Cheaper Liquid Fuel from Coal - MIT …

Radek Zboril received his Ph.D. degree at the Palacky University, Olomouc. After his Ph.D. studies, he took positions at the Universities of Tokyo, Delaware, and Johannesburg. Currently, he is a professor in the Department of Physical Chemistry and a general director of the Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials at Palacky University, Olomouc. His research interests are centered on nanomaterials, including iron- and iron oxide-based NPs, silver NPs, carbon nanostructures, and magnetic NPs, and encompass their synthesis, physicochemical characterization, and applications in catalysis, water treatment, antimicrobial treatment, medicine, and biotechnology. He has published more than 250 scientific papers, including 10 review papers in American Chemical Society (ACS) journals (e.g., , , ).

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