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endoprosthesis Definition: (END-oh-pross-THEE-sis) Syn: implant

endoprosthesis - definition and meaning

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biliary endoprosthesis - Definition

Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is indicated in high-risk patients for conventional surgery, with anatomic conditions for endoprosthesis implantation. Low morbidity, mortality and physiological aggressiveness have been expanding the indications for its use. Still, EVAR is questionable in younger patients, with a low surgical risk and a prolonged life expectancy. Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are rare in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients in western countries and have singular characteristics: an unknown etiology, multiple arterial involvement, poor open surgery results and risk of infection transmission to surgeons. For these reasons EVAR opened new therapeutic perspectives in this group of patients. We present our experience with two HIV patients in whom an AAA was diagnosed, one with a 10cm diameter treated by EVAR, excluded with an aorto-uni-iliac endoprosthesis, other followed regularly, describing their features and therapeutic results. The reported cases allow us to speculate on the importance of anti-retroviral and endovascular treatments reducing the inflammatory process on the arterial wall, with a consequent delay in aneurysm growth and even its regression, which reinforces the possible relevance of EVAR as a first line treatment for this particular pathology.

biliary endoprosthesis definition from the mondofacto online medical dictionary

Introduction: The patellar height can influence extensor mechanism and the knee function. Thus, during knee arthroplasty, the surgeon seeks to maintain the correct patellar height. However, it is more difficult to define and maintain the correct patella height in megaprosthesis reconstructions after tumor resections. The objective of this study was to evaluate patellar height after distal femur endoprosthesis reconstruction and its association to knee function. Methods: This retrospective analysis included 108 patients who underwent distal femur resections and endoprosthesis reconstruction. The minimum follow-up was 1 year or until the patients underwent patellar resurfacing or endoprosthesis revision. Patellar height was calculated using Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) and Insall-Salvati patellar tendon insertion ratio (PTR) at 2 different times: postoperatively and at the final follow-up. The postoperative ratio was calculated using the best postoperative radiograph taken at least 1 month after the procedure. The final measures were based on the radiograph available at the last follow-up consultation. The ISR and PTR were associated to anterior knee pain (AKP), range of motion (ROM), and extension lag (EXL). Results: The average follow-up was 4.5 years. The mean postoperative ISR was 1.02, and the mean ISR at final follow-up was 0.95 (

GORE® EXCLUDER® AAA Endoprosthesis

and bridging junctions combine to define an endoprosthesis having compliance properties to ..

N2 - Objective Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) will fail over time in a percentage of patients. Mechanical failure of the device, progression of aortic disease, or interface complications between the device and the native vasculature may contribute. Our aim was to evaluate the role of fenestrated and branched endografts as treatment options for failed devices. Methods Between January 2001 and June 2013, 970 patients were enrolled into a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption (PSIDE) study and treated with a fenestrated/branched endograft. All patients treated for nonurgent proximal neck failure of an infrarenal endoprosthesis previously implanted during EVAR comprised the study group. Patients treated for a primary aneurysm within the PSIDE were evaluated as a comparison group to identify preoperative risk factors for failure. A retrospective review was undertaken to determine the details of the initial EVAR, whereas the prospective PSIDE database was used to assess outcomes of secondary treatment. Three-dimensional imaging techniques were used to define all morphologic measurements. Statistical analysis included comparisons between categoric variables with the χ2 test and between continuous variables with the Wilcoxon rank sum test between patients with late failures and those with native aortic repair. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to analyze overall survival. Results Of 970 patients enrolled in the PSIDE, 54 (5.6%) had late failure of a prior endograft. Fenestrated/branched devices were used to address the failure in each patient. The etiology of failure was related to a proximal neck issue in all patients: type Ia endoleak in 38, stent migration in 18, neck degeneration in 28, or some combination of these factors. The endovascular rescue procedure took place a mean of 61 months after the primary procedure. The mean aneurysm diameter at reintervention was 67 mm. Patients requiring a secondary fenestrated procedure were younger at the time of their primary intervention (P =.039) and were more likely to have a history of chronic renal insufficiency (P =.05) compared with other patients in the PSIDE. Technical success rate in the study group was 85% (44 of 52). Successful stenting was achieved in 71 of 77 (92%) target vessels. Thirty-day mortality was 3.8% (two of 52). Fluoroscopy dose and operating time were longer in the rescue group (P =.07) than in the control group (P =.008). Secondary interventions were required in 36.5% (19 of 52) of patients. Conclusions Our series demonstrates the risk for late failure after EVAR is greater in patients who are younger and have chronic renal impairment at the time of implantation. Branched and fenestrated repair after failed EVAR is more complex than repair in the native aorta. More research is needed to identify patients at higher risk of failure after EVAR to prevent the need for rescue in the future.

AB - Objective Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) will fail over time in a percentage of patients. Mechanical failure of the device, progression of aortic disease, or interface complications between the device and the native vasculature may contribute. Our aim was to evaluate the role of fenestrated and branched endografts as treatment options for failed devices. Methods Between January 2001 and June 2013, 970 patients were enrolled into a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption (PSIDE) study and treated with a fenestrated/branched endograft. All patients treated for nonurgent proximal neck failure of an infrarenal endoprosthesis previously implanted during EVAR comprised the study group. Patients treated for a primary aneurysm within the PSIDE were evaluated as a comparison group to identify preoperative risk factors for failure. A retrospective review was undertaken to determine the details of the initial EVAR, whereas the prospective PSIDE database was used to assess outcomes of secondary treatment. Three-dimensional imaging techniques were used to define all morphologic measurements. Statistical analysis included comparisons between categoric variables with the χ2 test and between continuous variables with the Wilcoxon rank sum test between patients with late failures and those with native aortic repair. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to analyze overall survival. Results Of 970 patients enrolled in the PSIDE, 54 (5.6%) had late failure of a prior endograft. Fenestrated/branched devices were used to address the failure in each patient. The etiology of failure was related to a proximal neck issue in all patients: type Ia endoleak in 38, stent migration in 18, neck degeneration in 28, or some combination of these factors. The endovascular rescue procedure took place a mean of 61 months after the primary procedure. The mean aneurysm diameter at reintervention was 67 mm. Patients requiring a secondary fenestrated procedure were younger at the time of their primary intervention (P =.039) and were more likely to have a history of chronic renal insufficiency (P =.05) compared with other patients in the PSIDE. Technical success rate in the study group was 85% (44 of 52). Successful stenting was achieved in 71 of 77 (92%) target vessels. Thirty-day mortality was 3.8% (two of 52). Fluoroscopy dose and operating time were longer in the rescue group (P =.07) than in the control group (P =.008). Secondary interventions were required in 36.5% (19 of 52) of patients. Conclusions Our series demonstrates the risk for late failure after EVAR is greater in patients who are younger and have chronic renal impairment at the time of implantation. Branched and fenestrated repair after failed EVAR is more complex than repair in the native aorta. More research is needed to identify patients at higher risk of failure after EVAR to prevent the need for rescue in the future.

Diagnosis and Management of Popliteal Aneurysm

20/05/2004 · forming a cylinder from said film to define said endoprosthesis

N2 - Introduction: The patellar height can influence extensor mechanism and the knee function. Thus, during knee arthroplasty, the surgeon seeks to maintain the correct patellar height. However, it is more difficult to define and maintain the correct patella height in megaprosthesis reconstructions after tumor resections. The objective of this study was to evaluate patellar height after distal femur endoprosthesis reconstruction and its association to knee function. Methods: This retrospective analysis included 108 patients who underwent distal femur resections and endoprosthesis reconstruction. The minimum follow-up was 1 year or until the patients underwent patellar resurfacing or endoprosthesis revision. Patellar height was calculated using Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) and Insall-Salvati patellar tendon insertion ratio (PTR) at 2 different times: postoperatively and at the final follow-up. The postoperative ratio was calculated using the best postoperative radiograph taken at least 1 month after the procedure. The final measures were based on the radiograph available at the last follow-up consultation. The ISR and PTR were associated to anterior knee pain (AKP), range of motion (ROM), and extension lag (EXL). Results: The average follow-up was 4.5 years. The mean postoperative ISR was 1.02, and the mean ISR at final follow-up was 0.95 (

AB - Introduction: The patellar height can influence extensor mechanism and the knee function. Thus, during knee arthroplasty, the surgeon seeks to maintain the correct patellar height. However, it is more difficult to define and maintain the correct patella height in megaprosthesis reconstructions after tumor resections. The objective of this study was to evaluate patellar height after distal femur endoprosthesis reconstruction and its association to knee function. Methods: This retrospective analysis included 108 patients who underwent distal femur resections and endoprosthesis reconstruction. The minimum follow-up was 1 year or until the patients underwent patellar resurfacing or endoprosthesis revision. Patellar height was calculated using Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) and Insall-Salvati patellar tendon insertion ratio (PTR) at 2 different times: postoperatively and at the final follow-up. The postoperative ratio was calculated using the best postoperative radiograph taken at least 1 month after the procedure. The final measures were based on the radiograph available at the last follow-up consultation. The ISR and PTR were associated to anterior knee pain (AKP), range of motion (ROM), and extension lag (EXL). Results: The average follow-up was 4.5 years. The mean postoperative ISR was 1.02, and the mean ISR at final follow-up was 0.95 (

Definition of Endoprosthesis with photos and pictures, translations, sample usage, and additional links for more information.
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Medical Terminology for Cancer - CancerIndex

Objective Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) will fail over time in a percentage of patients. Mechanical failure of the device, progression of aortic disease, or interface complications between the device and the native vasculature may contribute. Our aim was to evaluate the role of fenestrated and branched endografts as treatment options for failed devices. Methods Between January 2001 and June 2013, 970 patients were enrolled into a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption (PSIDE) study and treated with a fenestrated/branched endograft. All patients treated for nonurgent proximal neck failure of an infrarenal endoprosthesis previously implanted during EVAR comprised the study group. Patients treated for a primary aneurysm within the PSIDE were evaluated as a comparison group to identify preoperative risk factors for failure. A retrospective review was undertaken to determine the details of the initial EVAR, whereas the prospective PSIDE database was used to assess outcomes of secondary treatment. Three-dimensional imaging techniques were used to define all morphologic measurements. Statistical analysis included comparisons between categoric variables with the χ2 test and between continuous variables with the Wilcoxon rank sum test between patients with late failures and those with native aortic repair. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to analyze overall survival. Results Of 970 patients enrolled in the PSIDE, 54 (5.6%) had late failure of a prior endograft. Fenestrated/branched devices were used to address the failure in each patient. The etiology of failure was related to a proximal neck issue in all patients: type Ia endoleak in 38, stent migration in 18, neck degeneration in 28, or some combination of these factors. The endovascular rescue procedure took place a mean of 61 months after the primary procedure. The mean aneurysm diameter at reintervention was 67 mm. Patients requiring a secondary fenestrated procedure were younger at the time of their primary intervention (P =.039) and were more likely to have a history of chronic renal insufficiency (P =.05) compared with other patients in the PSIDE. Technical success rate in the study group was 85% (44 of 52). Successful stenting was achieved in 71 of 77 (92%) target vessels. Thirty-day mortality was 3.8% (two of 52). Fluoroscopy dose and operating time were longer in the rescue group (P =.07) than in the control group (P =.008). Secondary interventions were required in 36.5% (19 of 52) of patients. Conclusions Our series demonstrates the risk for late failure after EVAR is greater in patients who are younger and have chronic renal impairment at the time of implantation. Branched and fenestrated repair after failed EVAR is more complex than repair in the native aorta. More research is needed to identify patients at higher risk of failure after EVAR to prevent the need for rescue in the future.

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